Thursday, 3 September 2015

The Royalists' Last Stronghold

Perceptive readers of my last post remembered that my last Supercampaign was accompanied by a full book detailing the twists and turns of the battles, written in the style of a real-world history book, and called Burning Tennessee.

Well, I'm pleased to be able to say I managed to put something similar together for the English Civil War campaign.  It's not on quite the same scale as Burning Tennessee (I had a lot of free time earlier this year to be able to write it), but it's got all the lovely details in there.  In a similar vein as my last book it's written in the style of an Osprey book, with maps and pictures re-captioned to describe our own campaign.

The front cover - the painting is actually Dutch, but has been 'recaptioned' to show the fictional
destruction of the town's magazine during the storming of the town.
My own fictional biography...
This map from the National Civil War Centre was superimposed with the details of our final battle...
Unfortunately, this project won't be for sale as all the appropriated pictures and styles are strictly 'for personal use'.  However, I'd be happy to share PDFs with people for free if you want to read the whole thing.  Just drop me an email, link in the sidebar.

And there you have it!  Something physical to look back on in later years and remember the campaign by.   Hope you enjoyed...

Ed

Saturday, 29 August 2015

English Civil War Superpost

My good self, the Marquess of Nottingham.
Pictures are from Jane Dunn.
Welcome back to Palladian Guard, where today I'll be sharing the results of our ECW Supercampaign!

What is a Supercampaign?

It's like a normal campaign, a series of linked battles played out on a map.  But we blur the lines with roleplaying - orders have to be written and troops moved around a master campaign map in real time.  Not using 'nodes' or 'pins', we really do work out how far the men march and how many miles they're spread out over!  There are secret notes, orders, couriers and subterfuges that make for a gripping campaign season.  Our most recent Supercampaign was the American Civil War one.

What's this Supercampaign all about?

Some might remember our recent trips to the National Civil War Centre - our gaming group are all from Newark in the UK, which was a Royalist stronghold during the Civil War.  This campaign saw us playing out the Third Siege, which lasted from late 1645 to the end of the war the following year.

Friday, 21 August 2015

Death Korps Tunnelling Squad

An update from the mists of time... I found these pics buried in my computer this morning, so I thought I'd share them in all their poorly-lit gloriness.  They're part of my nascent 500pt Death Korps army - in fact the only active 40K project I have on the go at the moment.  I've almost totally switched over to historical stuff, but still enjoy painting these figures for old times' sake.

If this were an Osprey book, I'd point out the camouflage helmets and blue turnback cuffs - both distinctions of Pioneer Korps units.  They are identifiable as part of the Divisional Pioneer Battalion (as opposed to Company Pioneer Platoon), since the latter are considered 'organic' and wear white turnback cuffs like the infantry unit they're attached to.

Thursday, 30 July 2015

National Civil War Centre

I notice a few weeks have slipped by, so time for an update.  I've got a lot of projects on the go - both in the wargaming world and in real life.  However the whole month of August is booked as leave, so I hope to have plenty to share with you over the coming weeks.

If you are a UK-based gamer, I thoroughly recommend a visit to the National Civil War Centre in Newark-on-Trent, Nottinghamshire.  I have an annual pass and can honestly say it's the best museum I've ever been to - I visit at least once a week.  Of course, we're currently planning our English Civil War campaign so there's a lot of research I do there but it's also quite a good family destination.  My brother takes his 8-month-old there - apparently the only thing that stops her crying is watching videos of pikemen.


Friday, 17 July 2015

Gaming in the Garden - 2mm Napoleonic Battle Report

A quick 'pic update' today with some photos of our recent 2mm Napoleonic smash.  We were using my modified set of Give Them The Cold Steel, tweaked for early nineteenth-century combat.  A 4x4 board was used, this time with a gaming mat which was very convenient - watch this space for a review next week.

As usual, I'll let the pictures and captions do the talking rather than doing a full dissection.  I played as the French, and Mike as the valiant Brits using 2mm Irregular Miniatures figures.

The gaming mat was from Game Mat EU - my favourite thing about it is
that you can easily make hills by putting books underneath the mat.

Thursday, 9 July 2015

Mordheim Battle Report: Blood on the Streets

With some unexpected time off, I managed to get two games of Mordheim in with Mike today.  Smashing games they were too - both played with our Gaming Philosophy in mind - lots of terrain, lots of fluff, a few skirmishing models.

This is part of a series of on-off games we're playing as part of a casual campaign, using the Fourth Kingdomites - a shooty warband with lots of muskets and pistols.  Facing off against them were Prince Leopold's finest, a tough warband that has won just about every encounter so far. A daunting prospect!

We diced for the Street Fight scenario, where a single road running through the middle is bordered by a row of houses, the rest of the board being impassible.  The objective was to get off the other side of the table.

Fourth Kingdomites
  • John Carew - leader
  • 'Naughty' Sally - champion
  • 'Deadeye' Rupert - champion (musketeer)
  • 'Strongarm' Roger - champion (musketeer)
  • 'Bish' (The Bishop of Ropeth & Mundy) - champion
  • The Three Musketeers - henchmen with muskets
Prince Leopold's Finest
  • Leopold, Prince of the People - leader, top floor
  • Gunther - champion, middle floor (L-R)
  • Maximilian - champion
  • Josef- champion
  • Alec - champion
  • Karl - champion
  • Marienburg Dandies Fencing Association - henchmen with swords
  • Marienburg Archery Society - henchmen with longbows
  • Tiny the Ogre
My worthy opponents!

Saturday, 27 June 2015

Size Isn't Everything - A Discussion on 2mm Wargaming

This blog started out as a firmly 28mm blog.  It was all about 40K at first, then moved into other historicals like WWII, with a wide variety of fantasy and non-fantasy games.  But they were all 28mm - until my recent American Civil War campaign, when I got into 2mm wargaming.  In this article I'm going to share some of the reasons for my love of 2mm gaming, and hopefully you'll share your own thoughts as well.

Cinematic, realistic, dramatic... 28mm wargaming all over.
How did you start collecting 2mm?

My main motivation for collecting and painting models is for the visual effect on the board.  I want my armies to look realistic - like a shot from a film, where possible.  Clearly, the biggest reason I started in 28mm was that it's the dominant scale for all wargaming, thanks to GW.  But they're also a good balance between detail and collectability, and every model I paint in 28mm improves my skill at that level and reinforces the preference.

I've always resisted wargames that aren't 1:1 scale - that is, games where one figure on the board doesn't represent one man in real life.  These games can still look great on the board, but for me there's just something not right about putting down ten models with a flag and calling it a 'regiment'.  It just chips away at my suspension of disbelief.

Tuesday, 23 June 2015

Battle Report: Meeting Engagement

As promised last week, I've got a quick batrep of our Battlefleet 1900 game from last weekend.  We were using the new Tumbling Dice 1:2400 ships, which were a real visual treat.

The engagement was between a Russian battleship, escorted by a cruiser, and a Japanese battleship supported by three destroyers.  Despite the clear firepower advantage the Russians had, destroyers have deadly torpedoes which can easily sink a larger ship.

As usual I'll stick with lightly-annotated pictures rather than a dissection.

The deployment.  The Russians (in blue, at the bottom) were
travelling left-to-right when the Japanese (top, in red) attacked.

Thursday, 18 June 2015

Battlefleet 1900: New 1:2400 ships

Frequent visitors to the blog (from before my sabbatical) may recall the Battlefleet 1900 games we played, re-enacting some battles from the Russo-Japanese War.  Well, while at Partizan this year I saw some excellent 1:2400 ships on the Tumbling Dice stand.  Spying an opportunity to snatch up some excellent models at a bargain price, I bought the £40 starter pack.  This doesn't supplant the 1:3000 WTJ models I already have, but rather allows for some new modelling opportunities and will be used to enact smaller ship-to-ship engagements rather than the fleet actions of the smaller-scale ships.


Friday, 29 May 2015

Random Project - Baneblade

Those of you fortunate enough to have been following this blog from the start will know full well that I am not a fan of Apocalypse models or games.  But recently, a friend asked me to paint up his Baneblade and was generous (or foolish) enough to say "paint it however you like!"

This is the result.  Having spent a day and a half smashing this project solidly I can still say I'm not a fan of the baneblade, it's an utterly rediculous tank and a real pain to build.  I did, however, enjoy yhe brutally simple process of painting it:

  • OD spraypaint
  • Wash with a huge tin of black ink
  • Wait to dry then sponge metal onto the corners
  • Dot every rivet with watered-down rust powder (not as bad as it sounds)
  • Heavy dose of black weathering powder on the muzzles etc
  • Detailing like the markings and lights
Voila!  A quick and simple project, and a good chance to try out some basic tank weathering ideas.  Enjoy!